Rewind several years and we find our son seriously struggling at school. His reading development has flatlined. First impact of dyslexia but also the Governments forced phonics teaching approach doesn’t help. He is increasingly alone in the playground. In lessons he struggles to stay still and concentrate. He’s become clumsy and his fine motor skills have deserted him.

We had a few warning signings at nursery but these we largely missed. In fact at nursery he was ahead of all his age development targets. He was a character who was happy to be the centre of attention. He had loads of friends and the little girls would fight over who was going to marry him. Within the course of a few months this all changed.

WELCOME TO THE WORLD OF ASPERGERS, DYSPRAXIA AND DYSLEXIA.

As we started the process of getting a diagnosis everything we tried failed to work. It felt like we were working in the dark. Any type of win would really boast everyone’s confidence. Step in LEGO.

On the recommendation of a health professional it was agreed with school that we try a teaching programme based on those magic little toy blocks. Over the course of a few months school would incorporate a number of 1 hour LEGO sessions into each week. At home we would take every opportunity to encourage our son to play with his LEGO in a structured way. The whole approach was heavily influenced by the increasing use of LEGO-BASED THERAPY in schools and autistic research. The process worked and delivered clear results.

  • The repeated process of picking up small and differing shaped blocks started to improve his finger control.
  • Incorporating role play and story telling into model building helped him develop his imagination.
  • In the school sessions increasingly other kids were brought into the programme. This really helped his team working and willingness to share. Plus it gave kids a chance to see a different side of our son.
  • Increasingly complex designs helped with improving concentration levels.
  • As every small milestone reached gained a certificate. Son could see progress. This really helped his confidence.

So in an increasingly alien world for our son and his struggling parents those little building blocks brought our first real ray of hope. They really do work.

Why?

Because learning works best when it’s fun.

52 thoughts on “Lego

  1. That’s a good point. Learning works best when it is fun. D never took to Legos. I have a huge bin because my oldest did but not D. Hoping he will take to them someday. They would really help with his fine motor skills which he struggles with. Good point!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. So agree. I sat with my daughter while my granddaughter had her tests. It was severe learning disabilities, as they don’t say autism, knowing they would have to provide help. I helped my daughter with the cost of extra education, that she forgot almost immediately.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Such a simple concept, a little Mary Poppins is all that’s needed to tidy the nursery or learn.

    Ben never liked Lego. He likes to arrange sidewalk chalk that’s been broken into different sizes, or have me tape wood blocks into shapes, or arrange colored dominos. Whatever works to stimulate their imaginations and sneak some learning in is the way to go.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Such a simple concept, a little Mary Poppins is all that’s needed to tidy the nursery or learn.

    Ben never liked Lego. He likes to arrange sidewalk chalk that’s been broken into different sizes, or have me tape wood blocks into shapes, or arrange colored dominos. Whatever works to stimulate their imaginations and sneak some learning in is the way to go.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Fun wins hands down. Our dyslexic eight year old’s fascination with origami is doing wonders for her confidence and fine motor co-ordination. – I wrote about it in my post yesterday – I seem to be echoing much of what you say here.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I do believe your son has the leaning lighthouse of Pisa??

    !00% !! Fun is the vital element to most things in life – or making them better or easier anyway. 🙂

    I think the reason is that it is hard to feel stressed when you are having fun and if anything kills the incentive to learn, or to work, it is increasing stress levels.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Always! In every single outdoor activity session I ever ran, ‘fun’ was the first base. I used to tell everyone who would listen I had three priorities as an instructor: safety, fun and instruction. In that order. make it fun and learning would automatically follow.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I have never heard of LEGO therapy. That is awesome, I love it when they come up with new and enjoyable forms of therapy, because therapy can be so intense if the child isn’t able to have fun! I’m glad that it could help put your son.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s