Looking through a few flower photos and guess what I found. Another appearance from our friendly garden visitor. This unexpected find brought a much needed smile.

The unexpected hospital visit was tough. It was physically and mentally tough for our son. Hospitals are not pleasant places at the best of times but during a pandemic. Just awful.

It was a routine procedure but it made me face some demons. Waiting for news in the building where my mother died and where I found out my partner would be dead within days. Too many traumatic memories flooded back. Sat by myself in a waiting room. Yes it’s ok to cry.

Those memories and the clear unpredictability of the future made me realise what is so important to me. The things I need to cherish and make the most of. No more trying to email when talking to our son. It’s such a bad habit, you miss out on so much and son can see the lack of focus. Quality time MEANS quality time. It took something so unpleasant to clear my mind and refocus my priorities. Your never to old to open your eyes.

63 thoughts on “Open your eyes

  1. How is the lad today Gary?
    Hospitals are not the safest of places and your boy was very brave in today’s circumstances.
    And yes, when you’re sitting alone in a waiting room not knowing what’s going to happen next, it is Ok to cry. Virtual hugs to you both. โค

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hospital visits truly are horrible during this pandemic, and I can’t even begin to imagine the traumatic memories that came flooding back to you. I’m sorry for that much, but glad that good things can come out of difficult experiences. I was right, you ARE a super dad. Enjoy it. I always enjoy reading about your son. He’s a light in this world too.

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  3. It is ALWAYS okay to cry!
    Things like Writing The Words and the building with tape are times when the device is put away. Ben DEMANDS full focus and it was a good lesson for me to learn.๐Ÿ˜‰
    Sending virtual, non kootie hugs๐Ÿ’Œ๐Ÿ’Œ

    Liked by 1 person

  4. So horrible, sitting alone in a hospital waiting. Typical that you found something good came out of it. Your young lad has the most amazing Dad. The words you use to talk of him as always so touching. Hugs to you both.

    Liked by 3 people

  5. I felt bad for my daughter when she accompanied me to the hospital for cancer because I was on the same floor, etc where my husband had passed away two years earlier. That was the worst part of it for me seeing her pain, remembering.

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  6. Yes itโ€™s ok to cry! I hope your son is feeling better today. I hope you are feeling better. And I must say this … you are a super dad! Never forget that. I felt it immediately when I found your blog and read the first post (not the first post from you but the first I read).

    Now, take care and warm hugs to both of you! I hope the sun will shine tomorrow, in many ways.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. I think many had painful experiences when they realize that they were so focused on “the necessary things” or “obligations” or on wanting to check off things of their agenda. And all of a sudden you see that you neglect those who are most meaningful or that you miss the moment which never comes back. No more regrets, just being in the moment and doing one thing at a time. The price is too high! And yes, we are never too old to realize it!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. We all could do better than we are doing today because we are simply not aware. We mustn’t judge ourselves for that. I am sure that you are a lot further regarding this insight!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. That is what I hoped to achieve with that book. When I was in the beginning of discovering a world beyond the my minds prison I had so many puzzle pieces in my hands but did not know how to put them together or there were some connection pieces missing. Those moments when the connection happened and the picture became clearer and bigger were amazing!

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      3. Those books (most of all those of Wayne Dyer) have stimulated a process I cannot reverse anymore. The awareness that life is a string of moments like stepstones which takes us further piece by piece. Them more aware we are the more pieces we discover and collect and the more patient we become because we know that when we are ready, we will be able to put them together. Until then we simply need to move on…

        Liked by 1 person

      4. According to the kindle Iโ€™m 90% through you book. So get it. The feel is like Iโ€™ve been looking out a window all these years. Too happy to keep closing the blinds. Suddenly Iโ€™ve worked out the window opens and suddenly itโ€™s a very different world.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. That’s one of the best ways to describe the feeling of realilzing that there is so much more about someone, about their lives, and about the abilities to live and create that life I have ever heard. And I so get you! I was I was exaclty the same. One day those “protective” walls become suffocating and the idea of a world beneath it (a world so much bigger and full of possibilities and options) so liberating. A feeling of being newly born. You confirm Wayne Dyer’s favorite quote of Einstein: “When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change!”
        I am happy, humbled, and thankful that the content of the book has taken you to that place of seeing a further. You have me smiling again, Gary ๐Ÿ˜Š

        Liked by 1 person

      6. That’s exactly the point. It is about (re-)programming our minds. It seems difficult in the beginning but it is only a matter of persistence and discipline and a change can be acchived within few days!

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Hospitals are not pleasant places. Especially at this moment. I hope your son is feeling better, Gary. That must have been a series of traumatic flashbacks. Sending you love and hugs from afar.

    Liked by 1 person

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